June 2018 Read – A Spectacle of Glory: God’s Light Shining through Me Every Day by Joni Eareckson Tada and Larry Libby

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A Spectacle of Glory: God's Light Shining through Me Every DayDo you ever wonder why God created you? The Bible spells it out plainly: God created you to showcase His glory—to enjoy it, display it, and demonstrate it every day to all those you encounter.

After nearly 50 years of living as a quadriplegic, and dealing with chronic pain on a daily basis, Joni has learned firsthand the importance of glorifying God through the toughest of situations. Through this devotional, Joni will help you discover how to put God’s glory on display—how to say no to complaining and say yes to daily following God down even the most difficult paths. Along the way, you will find great comfort and encouragement by focusing on the one who longs to lead and guide you every step of the way, every day.

Don’t ever think your life is too ordinary, your world too small, or your work too insignificant. All of it is a stage set for you to glorify God.

Joni Eareckson Tada

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May 21, 2018 – The World’s Last Night: And Other Essays (7th essay) by C. S. Lewis

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The World's Last Night  -     By: C.S. Lewis “The World’s Last Night” / “Christian Hope – Its Meaning for Today”
The last essay was written by Lewis about the Second Coming, using for its title (and part of the original essay) a phrase from the first line and title of a poem by seventh-century poet John Donne (1572-1631). That poem, “Holy Sonnet XIII: What If This Present Were The World’s Last Night?” raises the question of how we should live if the world were ending today. Originally entitled “Christian Hope–Its Meaning for Today,” this essay was first printed in the periodical Religion in Life (Winter 1952-53). Its purpose is stated in the first paragraph of the essay: “I shall endeavor to deal with some of the thoughts that may deter modern men from a firm belief in, or a due attention to, the return or Second Coming of the Saviour.” Dr. Albert Schweitzer had overemphasized this doctrine, but we should not compensate by under emphasizing it. The essay especially focuses on the nature of Christ, who was the God-Man, and it challenges the modern thought that history always produces progress. He concludes by suggesting that we live our lives, our vocations, with the understanding that there is a judgment coming.

Author: C. S. Lewis

April 2018 Read – The Photograph by Beverly Lewis (Author)

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The PhotographEva Esch and her sisters are in a predicament. With the passing of their widowed mother, Eva’s older brother Menno plans to move his growing family into the Eden Valley farmhouse where they all grew up, leaving little room for his three single sisters. Surely, Menno reasons, at least one of them will marry this coming wedding season. Eva does hope to marry, but she isn’t sure she wants to give up her sweet shop for the life of a farmer’s wife, and she has no other prospects.

When younger sister, Lily, disappears in the night, leaving only a brief note, Eva fears she has been wooed away from the People by an outsider. And when Jed Stutzman, a young Amish buggy maker from Ohio, shows up in Lancaster with a photo of a Plain young woman, Eva’s world begins to tilt. She feels powerfully drawn to the quietly charming stranger–but the woman in the forbidden photograph is no stranger at all. . . .

Author:  Beverly Lewis

March 19, 2018 – All Things New by Lynn Austin (Author)

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Book Cover: All Things New

The war is over. The South has lost.

Josephine Weatherly struggles to pick up the pieces of her life when her family returns to their Virginia plantation. But the realities of life after the war cannot be denied: her home and land are but a shell of their previous grandeur; death has claimed her father and brother; and her remaining brother, Daniel, has returned home bitter and broken.

Her life of privilege, a long-ago dream.

Josephine soon realizes that life is now a matter of daily survival–and recognizes that Lizzie, as one of the few remaining servants, is the one she must rely on to teach her all she needs to know. Josephine’s mother, too, vows to rebuild White Oak–but a bitter hatred fuels her.

Can hope–and a battered faith in God–survive amid the devastation?
In her bestselling tradition, Lynn Austin brings to life the difficult years of Reconstruction by interweaving the stories of three women–daughter, mother, and freed slave–in a riveting tale.
Author: Lynn Austin

February 2018 Read – A Lady of High Regard (Ladies of Liberty Book #1) by Tracie Peterson (Author)

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A Lady of High Regard (Ladies of Liberty Book #1) by [Peterson, Tracie]

Born into affluence, Mia Stanley is a winsome socialite with a knack for matchmaking. She’s also a writer for Godey’s Lady’s Book magazine, much to the disdain of her family–and their society friends. A proper young lady of her social standing isn’t meant to labor in such a way, but Mia has always had a way with words…

When her writing draws her into the world of downtrodden seamen’s wives on Philadelphia’s docks, Mia uncovers a scheme that puts her in harm’s way. But her heart ends up on the line as well…Has her determination to always make a match driven away the one man whose esteem she covets?

Author:  Tracie Peterson

January 15, 2018 – Me, Myself, and Bob: A True Story About Dreams, God, and Talking Vegetables by Phil Vischer (Author)

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Me, Myself, and Bob: A True Story About Dreams, God, and Talking Vegetables

This is a story of dreaming big and working hard, of spectacular success and breathtaking failure, of shouted questions, and, at long last, whispered answers. With trademark wit and heart, Phil Vischer shares how God can use the death of a dream to point us toward true success.

Larry. Bob. Archibald. These VeggieTales stars are the most famous vegetables you’ll ever eat. Oops, meet. Their antics are known around the world. But so much of the VeggieTales story hasn’t been told. In Me, Myself, and Bob, Phil Vischer, founder of Big Idea and creator of VeggieTales, gives a behind-the-scenes look at his not-so-funny journey with the loveable veggies. From famed creator to bankrupt dreamer, Vischer shares his story of trial and ultimate triumph as God inspired him with one big idea after another.

Author:  Phil Vischer

December 2017 Read – A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

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A Christmas Carol

A CHRISTMAS CAROL is a novella by Charles Dickens, first published in London on December 1843. The novella met with instant success and critical acclaim. A Christmas Carol tells the story of a bitter old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge and his transformation into a gentler, kindlier man after visitations by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come. The book was written at a time when the British were examining and exploring Christmas traditions from the past as well as new customs such as Christmas cards and Christmas trees. Carol singing took a new lease on life during this time. Dickens’ sources for the tale appear to be many and varied, but are, principally, the humiliating experiences of his childhood, his sympathy for the poor, and various Christmas stories and fairy tales.

Dickens was not the first author to celebrate the Christmas season in literature, but it was he who superimposed his humanitarian vision of the holiday upon the public, an idea that has been termed as Dickens’ “Carol Philosophy”. Dickens believed the best way to reach the broadest segment of the population regarding his concerns about poverty and social injustice was to write a deeply felt Christmas story rather than polemical pamphlets and essays. Dickens’ career as a best-selling author was on the wane, and the writer felt he needed to produce a tale that would prove both profitable and popular. Dickens’ visit to the work-worn industrial city of Manchester was the “spark” that fired the author to produce a story about the poor, a repentant miser, and redemption that would become A Christmas Carol. The forces that inspired Dickens to create a powerful, impressive and enduring tale were the profoundly humiliating experiences of his childhood, the plight of the poor and their children during the boom decades of the 1830s and 1840s, and Washington Irving’s essays on old English Christmas traditions published in his Sketch Book (1820); and fairy tales and nursery stories, as well as satirical essays and religious tracts.

Author: Charles Dickens

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